Planetary Science Directorate

SOUTHWEST RESEARCH INSTITUTE, BOULDER OFFICE

Upcoming SwRI Boulder Colloquia

Colloquia are normally on Tuesdays at 11:00 am in the 4th-floor conference room, except as indicated below in bold text.
Show previous colloquia

For questions or suggestions for speakers, please contact the SwRI colloquium organizers:
Hannah Kaplan, 720-208-7208 or kaplan(at)boulder.swri.edu
Derek Lamb, 720-208-7207 or derek(at)boulder.swri.edu
Katie Primm, 720-240-0124 or kprimm(at)boulder.swri.edu
Raluca Rufu, 303-226-0879 or raluca(at)boulder.swri.edu
Julien Salmon, 720-208-7203 or julien(at)boulder.swri.edu
Kelsi Singer, 303-226-5910 or ksinger(at)boulder.swri.edu

To be added to the SwRI Boulder Colloquia email list, please contact Kelsi Singer, ksinger(at)boulder.swri.edu

Tue Jan 28, 202011:00 am Tyler Lyson and  Ian Miller  Denver Museum of Nature & Science Exceptional continental record of biotic recovery after the Cretaceous–Paleogene mass extinction
Abstract: Sixty-six million years ago a 6 mile wide asteroid slammed into Earth and caused the extinction of more than 75% of life on Earth, including the dinosaurs. This event, known as the Cretaceous–Paleogene mass extinction (KPgE), was the single worst day for life on Earth. How and when life rebounded in the aftermath of the extinction has been shrouded in mystery due to a poor fossil record. We present a time-calibrated stratigraphic section in Colorado that contains unusually complete fossils of mammals, reptiles, and plants, and elucidates the drivers and tempo of biotic recovery during the poorly known first million years after the KPgE. Within ~100 thousand years (ka) post-KPgE, mammalian taxonomic richness doubled and maximum mammalian body mass increased to near pre-KPgE levels. A three-fold increase in maximum mammalian body mass and dietary niche specialization occurred at ~300 ka post-KPgE, concomitant with increased megafloral standing species richness. The appearance of additional large mammals occurred by ~700 ka post-KPgE, coincident with the first appearance of Leguminosae (bean family). These concurrent plant and mammal originations and body mass shifts coincide with warming intervals, suggesting climate influenced post-KPgE biotic recovery.
Tue Feb 11, 202011:00 am Nicholas Featherstone University of Colorado Boulder TBD Solar Convection
Tue Feb 25, 202011:00 am Kathryn Steakley NASA Ames TBD Impacts
Tue Mar 3, 202011:00 am Hakeem Oluseyi NASA Headquarters TBD Science Outreach
Tue Mar 31, 202011:00 am Hannah Jang-Condel University of Wyoming TBD