Planetary Science Directorate

SOUTHWEST RESEARCH INSTITUTE, BOULDER OFFICE

Upcoming SwRI Boulder Colloquia

Colloquia are normally on Tuesdays at 11:00 am in the 4th-floor conference room, except as indicated below in bold text.
Show previous colloquia

For questions or suggestions for speakers, please contact the SwRI colloquium organizers:
Tim Bowling, tbowling(at)boulder.swri.edu
Simon Porter, 303-226-0868 or porter(at)boulder.swri.edu, or
Julien Salmon, 720-208-7203 or julien(at)boulder.swri.edu
Kelsi Singer, 303-226-5910 or ksinger(at)boulder.swri.edu

To be added to the SwRI Boulder Colloquia email list, please contact Simon Porter at porter(at)boulder.swri.edu

Tue Feb 27, 201811:00 am Jennifer Scully Jet Propulsion Laboratory The Formation and Evolution of Ceres’ Occator Crater
Tue Mar 6, 2018
In 5th-floor conference room
11:00 am Dani DellaGiustina University of Arizona LPL The OSIRIS-REx Mission to (100955) Bennu: Overcoming the Challenges Associated with Mapping Small Bodies
Tue Mar 13, 201811:00 am Shijie Zhong University of Colorado Boulder Formation of the lunar fossil bulges and its implication for the early Earth and Moon
Abstract: First recognized by Laplace over two centuries ago, the Moon’s present tidal-rotational bulges are significantly larger than hydrostatic predictions. They are likely relics of a former hydrostatic state when the Moon was closer to the Earth and had larger bulges, and they were established when stresses in a thickening lunar lithosphere could maintain the bulges against hydrostatic adjustment. We formulate the first dynamically self-consistent model of this process and show that bulge formation is controlled by the relative timing of lithosphere thickening and lunar orbit recession. Viable solutions indicate that lunar bulge formation was a geologically slow process lasting several hundred million years, that the process was complete about 4 Ga when the Moon-Earth distance was less than ~32 Earth radii, and that the Earth in Hadean was significantly less dissipative to lunar tides than during the last 4 Gyr, possibly implying a frozen hydrosphere due to the fainter young Sun.
Thu Mar 15, 201811:00 am Denis Bodewits University of Maryland TBD
Tue Mar 27, 201811:00 am Olivier Barnoiun Applied Physics Laboratory TBD
Tue Apr 3, 201811:00 am Nicole Duncan Ball Aerospace Gamma-Ray Observations of Solar Flares with RHESSI Imaging-Spectroscopy and the GRIPS instrument
Tue May 1, 201811:00 am Slava Solomatov Washington University in St. Louis Magma Ocean Dynamics